2017 NASPA Multicultural Institute: Advancing Equity and Inclusive Practice

December 10 – December 12, 2017
Hyatt Regency New Orleans - New Orleans, Louisiana

The 2017 NASPA Multicultural Institute: Advancing Equity and Inclusive Practice is the premier event for student affairs and academic affairs professionals who are seeking an interactive forum that combines thought-provoking keynote speakers, challenging educational sessions, and opportunities for resource and idea sharing. The Institute exists to connect those with responsibilities for and those who are passionate about multicultural education at institutions across the country.

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About

The Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Practitioners approved by NASPA specify that knowledge and skills related to equity, diversity, and inclusion are an expectation of all practitioners regardless of their area of specialization or positional role within the field. The NASPA Multicultural Institute is intentionally designed for student affairs practitioners and administrators to further expand their own awareness, further develop skills as a multicultural educators, and exchange best practices for supporting historically underrepresented and marginalized college student populations. Institute participants will engage in a multitude of topics related to multiculturalism, intercultural competency, cross-culturalism and social justice by focusing on race and ethnicity; sexual orientation; sex, gender, and gender identity; ability, nationality; religion and spirituality; and socioeconomic class.

The 2017 NMI will focus on the following themes:

  • Fostering Inclusive Excellence and Pluralism on Campus through Collaborations: How are we defining collaboration and communication from an intersectional framework; does it address visible and invisible identities?

  • Social and Public Movement and Political Unrest: What are promising practices and structures on campus that enable the campus community to engage in effective comprehensive violence prevention, especially prevention of discriminatory violence? What promising practices are campuses using to engage in meaningful dialogue about issues of power, equity, oppression, inclusion, discrimination, and social justice on our campus?

  •  Incorporating Theory, Narratives, Research and Practice in Multicultural Efforts on Campus: How can we incorporate theory, narratives, and research in multicultural education and across disciplines, as it relates to underrepresented groups and identity development of students?
  • Immigration, Undocumented Students, and Identity: What are the implications of immigration in higher education across various identities?

  • The Role of State Legislation on Equity and Inclusion Efforts on Campus: In an era in which campus equity and inclusion efforts are regularly targeted by state legislators, creating inclusive campus environments can be difficult.

 

Presented By


Audience

This event is most likely to influence these groups.

  • Faculty
  • New Professional
  • Mid-Level
  • Senior Level
  • Graduate

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Call for Programs

At this time, our Call for Programs is now closed. Thank you for your submissions to the 2017 NASPA Multicultural Institute: Advancing Equity and Inclusive Practice.

The Institute content advisory committee seeks proposals that effectively advance the understanding of topics related to multiculturalism, intercultural competency, cross-culturalism, and social justice by focusing on race and ethnicity; sexual orientation; sex, gender, and gender identity; ability, nationality; religion and spirituality; and socioeconomic class. Presenters will be asked to identify the content level of their session; foundational, intermediate, or advanced. Additionally, the content advisory committee will select programs based upon their relationship to the Institute's learning outcomes.

Conference Themes & Suggested Topics

  • Fostering Inclusive Excellence and Pluralism on Campus through Collaborations

    How are we defining collaboration and communication from an intersectional framework; does it address visible and invisible identities? Programs submitted under this theme should help participants:

    • Gain knowledge of social identities and their intersectionalities;
    • Identify key attributes and learn how campus and community partnerships positively influence the campus climate for diverse populations while assessing the effectiveness of collaboration;
    • Develop strategies to determine campus climate needs and identify appropriate collaborative opportunities;
    • Build awareness of accessibility as a component for individuals to access and participate with limited/no barriers to their identity/disability; and
    • Build skills in facilitating difficult conversations to increase understanding and awareness of multiculturalism among

  • Social and Public Movement and Political Unrest

    What are promising practices and structures on campus that enable the campus community to engage in effective comprehensive violence prevention, especially prevention of discriminatory violence? What promising practices are campuses using to engage in meaningful dialogue about issues of power, equity,oppression, inclusion, discrimination, and social justice on our campus? Programs submitted under this theme should help participants:

    • Develop strategies to support students, faculty, and staff in discussions around social unrest, its causes and consequences, and how we can impact society;
    • Support and affirm the activist identities of students, faculty and staff while creating opportunities for activism;
    • Reflect on the intersection of personal and political views with policies and procedures on college campuses;
    • Explore intersectional perspectives on power, equity, oppression, inclusion, discriminatory violence, and social justice on campus and in society; and
    • Ascertain campus readiness and the impact of socio-political movements while learning about comprehensive violence prevention strategies, on our campus and community including: primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies for discriminatory violence that is directed at, or disproportionately affects certain underrepresented, marginalized or otherwise oppressed groups.

  • Incorporating Theory and Narratives with Research and Practice in Multicultural Efforts on Campus

    How can we incorporate theory, narratives, and research in multicultural education and across disciplines, as it relates to underrepresented groups and identity development of students? Programs submitted under this theme should help participants:

    • Learn foundational and contemporary theoretical perspectives as they relate to working with students from diverse backgrounds;
    • Explore strategies to support diverse student populations and their identity development in a rapidly changing global context;
    • Develop strategies to incorporate an intersectional framework into practical applications on campus; and
    • Identify ways to use theory and research to influence campus policy and practice.

  • Immigration, Undocumented Students, and Identity

    What are the implications in higher education across various identities? Programs submitted under this theme should help participants:

    • Gain awareness of the impact of immigration and immigration policies on our work with students and how to respond to the influence of politics;
    • Learn strategies for advocating for policies and governance that support the needs of undocumented students;
    • Understand how immigration policy affects students across identities; and
    • Identify best practices in supporting undocumented students.

  • The Role of State Legislation on Equity and Inclusion Efforts on Campus

    In an era in which campus equity and inclusion efforts are regularly targeted by state legislators, creating inclusive campus environments can be difficult. Programs submitted under this theme should help participants:

    • Understand how to leverage executive leadership staff and relationships with legislators to proactively communicate with legislators about current equity and inclusion efforts on campus;
    • Work with senior student affairs administrators to develop communication plans to address high profile bias incidents, protests and controversial speakers and events on campus;
    • Identify the range of state legislative issues impacting equity and inclusion on campus, including discriminatory bathroom bills, safe space legislation, sanctuary campus legislation and more; and
    • Determine how to stay informed on the state legislative developments impacting their campuses, and distinguish between advocacy on behalf of diverse students populations versus institutional lobbying. 



Looking for tips on writing an effective NASPA proposal? See sample submissions and formatting tips in our Program Submission Guidelines.

Submission Timeline
  • June 30, 2017
    Early-Early Bird Registration Deadline
  • July 14, 2017
    Call for Programs Deadline
  • September 1, 2017
    Program Status Notification
  • October 5, 2017
    Early-Bird Registration Deadline

Writing Tips

Looking for tips on writing an effective NASPA proposal? See sample submissions and formatting tips in our Program Submission Guidelines.

Questions?

Please contact NASPA if you have any further questions about submitting a program proposal for the 2017 NASPA Multicultural Institute: Advancing Equity and Inclusive Practice.

Robert Valderrama
Assistant Director of Educational Programs
Phone: 202-265-7500 ext 1177
Email: rvalderrama@naspa.org

Schedule

The schedule was designed to provide participants with interactive and engaging programming, opportunities for deeper discussion, and networking. Check out the 2017 offerings and begin building your schedule!

Sun, Dec 10

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Registration Open
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Pre-Institute Workshops
A Cultural Paradigm Shift: Infusing Diversity into your Recruitment and Retention Plan
Context Before Content: "Diversity and Inclusion” Work In This Moment and Time
I get that there’s Racism on Campus, but what Should I do now? Skills for Whites to Engage in Challenging Conversations and Partner to Create Change
Responding to a Discriminatory Incident at School
1:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Welcome and Opening Keynote
3:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions I
A New Framework to Inclusive Excellence
BGLO Hazing: The Unspoken Black-on-Black Crime
Developing Inclusion Practitioners: An Innovative Structure for Creating Sustainable Organizational Change
Disability in Higher Education: Exploring our Power and Privilege
Facilitation Skills, Theory, and Practice for Effective Multi-Cultural Dialogue
From the Ground Up: Step-By-Step Guide to Creating a Cultural Responsiveness Training Program
Growing Together: A Collaborative Model of Student Organization Programming
Our Stories Matter: Using Narrative Sharing to Empower Marginalized Communities
Questioning Whiteness: Engaging Creative Arts for Social Change
(Re)Construction of the Chief Diversity Officer: Director, Associate Provost, or Vice President
Soy Yo: Empowering Scholar Narratives in Predominantly White Spaces
Social Justice Peer Educators
4:30 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions II
Ban This! Immigration Legislation, Travel Bans, and More for International and Graduate Students
Best Practices for Serving Undocumented Students Identified as Current and Former Foster Youth.
Beyond the Rhetoric: Advancing Diversity and Inclusion at a Predominantly White Institution
Building Cultural Intelligence between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Students at University of Saskatchewan
Cultural Ties: Native American College Students and the Feeling of Family
Engaging Complexity in Community: An Oral History Project with Multiracial Students and Professionals
First but not Last: A Collaborative Approach to Retain First-Generation Students
Graduate School Voyage for Students of Color through Critical Race and Socialization Theories
Mindful Retention: Texas A&M Residence Life’s Black & Latinx First Year Student Retention Program
Narrative as a Tool to Foster Students Sense of Self
Rethinking Identity Development: The Social Justice Retreat as a Site for Transformation
Understanding the Relationship and Practice of Vincent Tinto’s Theory of Institutional Departure from a Cultural Competency Lens
5:45 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.
Opening Reception

Mon, Dec 11

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Registration Open
7:45 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
Continental Breakfast
8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
Morning Keynote
9:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m
Mini Institutes
But I'm NOT Racist! Tools for Well-Meaning Whites
Collective Impact: Community Organizing on Behalf of Latino Student Success
Confronting Islamophobia: Proactive Efforts to Address Hate and Bias on Campus
Emotional Labor within a Hostile Climate: Increasing Capacity of Men of Color
Environments Matter: Centering the QTPSOC Experience in Identity-Based Spaces
Gender Diversity: Creating Inclusion in Higher Education for Trans Students
Grappling with Oppression: Perspectives on Engaging in Discussion with Student Affairs Professionals
Is Inclusion the goal? Critical Conversations on Inclusion Rhetoric in Higher Education
LEADing from Unexpected Places
Mainstream Activists: Straddling the Roles of Administrator and Student Advocate
Re-examining Access and Fostering Inclusive Excellence in Graduate Education
TRANS: Training Responsible Allies in Navigating Solidarity
11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
No Host Lunch
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Panel Session
2:15 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Concurrent Session III
Achieving Student Success through Effective Diversity and Assessment Partnerships
Back Talk: Disrupting Cultural Hegemony and “Academic Space” through the Campus Open Mic
Creating Positive Work Spaces: Avoiding Microaggressions in the Workplace
Gender vs Gender Identity: There is a Difference… and it Matters
Higher Education Equity and Inclusiveness: Student Success Initiatives for At-Risk Students
Integrating Diversity and Inclusion in Online Programming: A Collaborative and Intersectional Approach
Leveraging Student Power: Action Planning for Change
Reframing the Conversation of Diversity & Inclusion on Campus
Strangers in a Strange Land: Cross-Campus Collaborations to Assist International Graduate Students
What About Us? Sexual Assault Prevention in Marginalized Student Communities
2:15 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Flash Sessions
A Case Study: Contemporary Undocumented College Student Experiences
“Fresh Off the Boat” Syllabus
From Theory to Practice: Engaging College Students in the Process of Empowerment
Front-line Student Affairs Professionals Providing Access to College for Undocumented Students
One Size Fits Some: Using Culturally Relevant Advising for Student Success
Project Collaborate: Building an Inclusive Health Professions Pipeline from Classroom to Community
Toward an Equitable and Inclusive Approach to Career Advising in Graduate Education
3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Concurrent Session IV
A College with an Equity Mindset, Advancing Equity, and inclusive practice
Activating Intersectionality: Now what?
Calling In, Speaking Up, and Taking Breaks: Managing Self-Care in the Perilous Work of Diversity Education
Creating Multicultural Spaces in Residential Communities: University of Michigan Housing Case Study
DREAMZone Ally Training: Best Practices to Better Support and Advise Undocumented Students
It takes a Village: Ways to help Mulicultural Student Organizations Collaborate
Policing Higher Education: The History and Impact of Police Departments on College Campuses
Seguimos Adelante: Latina Faculty Voices on their Path to Academia
Self-Care and Healing as Campus Change Agents: Renewing, Rejuvenating, and Recommitting
Undoing the White Savior Complex Through On-Campus Collaborations
Using Critical Race Theory to Influence Your Annual State Budget Requests for Diversity Offices
Utilizing Diversity Initiatives to Enhance Underrepresented Graduate Student Recruitment and Retention
4:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
Concurrent Session V
Age Is More than Just A Number: Intergenerational Inclusivity at Work
Being a Muslim Ally: Learning the Basics
Engaging Learning Outcomes by Developing Skills
Connecting Campus Values and Orientation Programming: Calling Students In, not Out
Honoring All Voices: Decolonizing Assessment Practices
How White Women Supervisors Can Best Support Men of Color Student Leaders
Ignite Interfaith Leadership, Influence Change: Interfaith Engagement, Spiritual Development, & Student Empowerment
Peace, Justice, and Inclusion Program: A Model for University and Community Engagement
Real Talk: Tools for Creating Intergroup Dialogue with Colleagues, Students, and Beyond
The Power, Pain, and Pride Behind the Voices of Latina Student Affairs Professionals
The Rise of Student Activism: The Positive Intersection Between Campus Activism and Leadership Education
We Are Family: Building Purposeful Collaboration through Intersectional Theory

Tue, Dec 12

7:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Registration Open
7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
Continental Breakfast
8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
Morning Keynote
9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions VI
#DoitFortheCulture: Collaborations for Culturally Relevant Mental Health Support
Beyond Safe Zone: A New Model for LGBTQ & Allyship Training
Engagement in Activism by Faculty and Student Affairs Professionals on Campus: Balance and Support?
Examining Dominant Culture Narratives in College Student Leadership Programs
Forging Your Own Path: Fostering Multicultural Experiences When Formal Structures are Missing
Gaps and Promising Practices for Religion, Spirituality, and Worldview: Supporting Students & Campuses
Identifying and Interrupting Whiteness in Student Affairs
Supporting Muslim Students in 2017
11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Concurrent Session VII
Being the Chief Diversity Officer in a (New) Racialized Higher Education Climate
Building Bridges not Barriers: Inclusive Collaborations between Multicultural and First-Year Offices
It’s Absolutely [not] About Child Safety
From Town Halls to Institutional Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Strategic Plan
Language Matters: Building Community through Inclusive Dialogue
Making the Invisible Man Visible through Equity Minded and Inclusive Practices
Reading Between the Lines: What Student Demands (Don't) Tell Us
The Right, The Left, The Center: Supporting Students with Varying Political and Social Identities

Pre-Conference Programs & Events

A Cultural Paradigm Shift: Infusing Diversity into your Recruitment and Retention Plan

Sunday, December 10th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Robert N. Page Jr., executive director, Metropolitan Community College

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This session will focus on the challenges and opportunities that institutions may have in the development of a comprehensive multicultural recruitment and retention plan. We will discuss how to formulate a plan that could work with the many cultural challenges facing our communities. The goal is to be able to address some of the challenges that face multicultural recruitment and retention initiatives by understanding multiculturalism, which could shape your best practices and initiatives.  This engaging session will also provide a tool kit to the development of a plan with proven results. 

Context Before Content: "Diversity and Inclusion” Work In This Moment and Time

Sunday, December 10th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington (He/Him/His) President, Washington Consulting Group (WCG) President & Co-Founder, Social Justice Training Institute (SJTI) Vice President, American College Personnel Association (ACPA)
Sam Offer, Vice President, Washington Consulting Group Faculty, Student Social Justice Training Institute

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Power, Privilege, Oppression, Micro aggression, Implicit Bias, Covering, "Man Splaining", White Tears, Non Binary, Universal Design, Demands, Title IX, and Self Care...: These words, phases and more are all a part of diversity and inclusion work in this current moment.  While some of us understand and use these words everyday, we are working within organizations where we are trying to do content, without a full grasp of the context.  In order to create real culture change there must be a willingness to examine and assess the context. This session will provide an opportunity for not only understanding and engaging the content of the work today, but also offer participants the tools and skills need to effectively assess the context in order to create greater success in “diversity and inclusion” efforts. 

I get that there’s Racism on Campus, but what Should I do now? Skills for Whites to Engage in Challenging Conversations and Partner to Create Change

Sunday, December 10th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Kathy Obear, co-founder, The Social Justice Training Institute

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Recognizing the daily racist dynamics and exclusionary institutional processes is a critical first step. While being able to notice more dynamics, many whites freeze and do not know what to say or do to navigate meaningful conversations about race or how to actively work with others to dismantle racist policies, practices, and programs on campus. In this highly interactive, reflective session, white participants can find their courage to speak up as they deepen their capacity to engage in authentic conversations about race and racism and identify strategies to create greater racial justice on campuses.

Responding to a Discriminatory Incident at School

Sunday, December 10th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Lee Mun Wah, executive director, StirFry Seminars Consulting

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Often, discriminatory incidents and lawsuits emerge from environments where diversity issues are seldom discussed and where cultural differences are "celebrated" but not practiced or represented.  During this workshop, we will explore how to create a culturally competent and sensitive academic community that is able to embrace and respond to diversity.

Registration

We invite you to register for the 2017 Multicultural Institute.

Register Online

Registration Fees

Early Bird
07/01/2017 to 10/05/2017
Regular
10/06/2017 to 11/12/2017
Late
11/13/2017 to 12/12/2017
NASPA Member
$450
$500
$575
Non-Member
$650
$700
$775
NASPA Student Member
$155
$185
$230
Pre-Institute Workshops
$85
$90
$95

Questions?

Tonya Murphy
Member Services Coordinator
Email: events@naspa.org
Phone: 202-265-7500 ext. 1183

Robert Valderrama
Assistant Director of Educational Programs
Email: rvalderrama@naspa.org
Phone: 202-265-7500 ext 1177

Policies

View Registration Policies

Cancellation:  The cancellation deadline to receive a refund is October 1, 2017, less a $50.00 administrative fee.  No refunds will be given after the deadline for any reason.  All requests for cancellation and refunds must be in writing and sent to refund@naspa.org. This program may be cancelled or postponed due to unforeseen circumstances. In this case, fees will be refunded; however, NASPA will not be responsible for additional costs, charges, or expenses, including cancellation/change charges assessed by airlines, hotels, and/or travel agencies. NASPA is not responsible for weather or travel related problems and will not reimburse registration fees for these issues.

Purchase Orders: NASPA does NOT accept purchase orders as a form of payment. For registrants requiring an invoice to have a check payment processed, please use the Bill Me payment method to complete your registration. The resulting invoice can be found and downloaded under the My NASPA section of the website (must be logged-in), by selecting the View Invoices link from the dropdown menu. Alternatively, email a request to Membership to have a PDF of your invoice sent to you. Bill Me registrations are considered complete and will hold your place in an event, however the balance due must be settled prior to attending.

Click here to view NASPA’s complete Payment Policies and Procedures.

Additional Questions? Please contact the NASPA office at 202-265-7500 or via e-mail to events@naspa.org.

Speakers


  • Dr. Shaun R. Harper

    Dr. Shaun R. Harper

    Clifford and Betty Allen Professor and Executive Director, USC Race and Equity Center
    University of Southern California

    Speaker Bio

  • Dr. Sumun Pendakur

    Dr. Sumun Pendakur

    Chief Learning Officer and Director of the USC Equity Institutes at the USC Race and Equity Center
    University of Southern California

    Speaker Bio

  • Dr. Michael J. Sorrell

    Dr. Michael J. Sorrell

    President
    Paul Quinn College

    Speaker Bio

  • Dr. Ajay Nair

    Dr. Ajay Nair

    Senior Vice President and Dean of Campus
    Emory University

    Speaker Bio

  • Dr. Arnel W. Cosey

    Dr. Arnel W. Cosey

    Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and the Executive Dean
    Delgado Community College, City Park

    Speaker Bio

  • Dr. Angela E. Batista

    Dr. Angela E. Batista

    Interim Vice President of Student Life and Special Advisor to the President for Diversity and Inclusion
    Champlain College

    Speaker Bio

Sponsors


If you would like to exhibit at or sponsor the 2017 NASPA Multicultural Institute please fill out the exhibitor application form and e-fax back all pages to 202-204-8443 or scan and e-mail to kjerde@naspa.org by November 3, 2017. Questions? Contact Kristie Jerde by phone at 218-280-7578 or via email at kjerde@naspa.org.

Special Thanks To…

Venue

Hyatt Regency New Orleans


Hyatt Regency New Orleans
New Orleans, LA

All conference activities will take place at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans.

Experience the best of the Big Easy at our award-winning downtown New Orleans hotel. Located right next door to the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, Smoothie King Center and Champions Square, Hyatt Regency New Orleans offers easy access to the area's most popular attractions. Hop on the Loyola Avenue Streetcar, or take a walk to the historic French Quarter, Arts District, Audubon Aquariam of the Americas and the scenic Mississippi Riverfront.

NASPA has arranged special room rates for conference attendees at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans starting at $169/night (not including the 14% state and local taxes). The cut-off date to receive the conference room rate is Wednesday, November 15, 2017. Rooms in the conference block may sell out prior to the cut-off date so please make your reservation as soon as possible.  Took book your reservation online,  please click the "book your hotel room now" button below. To book a room by phone, please call (504) 561 - 1234 and reference "NASPA Student Affairs Administrators"

BOOK YOUR HOTEL ROOM NOW

Hotel Room Rate/Night
Hyatt Regency New Orleans
601 Loyola Ave, New Orleans, LA 70113
(504) 561 - 1234
$169 - Single
$169 - Double
$179 - Triple
$189 - Quadruple

Additional Info

Attire
The dress for NASPA events is business casual.

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